The history of the trucking dispute of the US with Mexico can be traced within all the trade disputes between these two neighbors. The trade with Mexico was very small from the 1930s to middle the 1980s due to trade protectionist policies of Mexico. Mexico was making big efforts to be independent, it started by establishing all sort of restrictions against foreign investments, and trades. Mexico was trying to reinforce their industrial capacity, as well as the government was controlling more and more resources such as mining, or oil. Nevertheless, this strategy did not give the expected results, and in the 1980s a harsh inflation make the standard of living to decline rapidly (Villarreal 1, NAFTA).

In 1982 Mexico declared the inability to pay the country enormous debt. Mexico’s President, Miguel de la Madrid, stepped in and nationalized Mexico’s banks, although privatizing many state industries and making substantial movements towards trade liberalization as the only solution to Mexico economy. This background is important because it established the state of Mexico economy when they were seeking a free trade alliance with the US. The strategy changed from a strict protectionism to a non-stop openness of Mexico’s market, although Mexico economy was extremely poor, as well as terrible low education levels (Villarreal 2, NAFTA).

Even though Mexico low economic level at that time it managed to close ties with the US. In 1986 the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) was signed to assured future free trade measures between both countries. The next year, in 1987 they both agreed on the Framework of Principles and Procedures for Consultation Regarding Trade and Investment Relations, which become the first legal framework to monitor trade relations. Following, in October 1989 a second agreement was reach: The Understanding Regarding Trade and Investment Facilitation Talks, which amplifies the previous one. A free trade trajectory that was clear to President Carlos Salinas de Gortari of Mexico when he approached President George H. W. Bush in 1990 to start negotiating what will become the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in 1993. NAFTA entered into effect in January 1994 (Villarreal 2, NAFTA).

A short cartoon documentary on NAFTA, done a few years back. Posted Oct 9, 2007

Welcome to the United States – Mexico Trucking Dispute Blog.

Here I will debate the issues of the trucking dispute between United States and Mexico that has been going on for the last 15 years!!!

I will start by giving a background of the issue, then each side will follow. Those in favor and those against opening borders.

Later on, once I have finish my research, I will try to analyze both sides arguments to the best of my skill!

I will be trying to reach a conclusion by December. Just trying to position my self, and trying to find a solution for such problem.

I will also be posting summaries of different related news, post or articles debating the dispute.

I am a senior student at St. Edward’s University, in Austin. I am doing research in the Mexico – U.S. trucking dispute. I decided to create this blog to create a virtual place to publicly debate this problem, a place where anybody, from anywhere could find accurate information regarding this issue. All my sources will be cited according to MLA, and you will be able to find them in the sources tab.

Feel free to comment!

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  • Supreme Court rejects OOIDA challenge to ELD mandate June 12, 2017
    The U.S. Supreme Court today rejected OOIDA’s lawsuit challenging the federal government’s rule mandating the use of electronic logging devices on most trucks, leaving in place the Dec. 18 deadline for carriers to put them into use. OOIDA claimed the mandate violated drivers’ Constitutional protections against warrantless searches and seizures and that the r […]
    admin@mexicotrucker.com (PM Corn)
  • Hours of Service Revisions for Mexican Truckers coming in second Half of 2017 April 20, 2017
    The private sector and federal authorities are preparing to unveil in  second half of this year, new Hours of Service standards for operators of federal motor transportation services, which will regulate the number of hours driving and mandatory rest times. Felipe de Javier Peña, Vice-President of the Transport Commission of Concamin, reported that the measu […]
    admin@mexicotrucker.com (PM Corn)
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